EDIT: Shortly after this post, I heard back from Pierce County that the partnership is ending shortly due to new financial obligations that Treehouse is requiring to continue offering free access for all of their cardholders. And sure enough, the links in this post are no longer working. So, I’ll leave the post up for posterity but this deal no longer applies. 🙁 Sorry gang. 

Happy new year, dear readers! 2016 started for me with a whirrr and a bang and a wahoo! and other noises indicative that your cozy holiday break is OVER, friend. Get up and get moving, we’ve got class/meet-ups/projects/job applications/interviews to knock out.

One of my resolutions was to finally get signed up for a free Treehouse membership via Pierce County Library System (which has a reciprocal relationship with King County Library System and other library systems in the greater Seattle area). And this might have remained a hypothetical “I should get to that… soon” if not for one of my new 301 students, who was like, “or you could do it now!” (Thanks Ron and Yun Joo!)

It’s simple to do, and Treehouse has some great tutorials for beginning and more experienced programmers seeking to expand your skills. If you live in the Greater Seattle Area, please take advantage of this!

Sign up for Treehouse with Pierce County Library partnership

Here’s how to do it…

Step 1: Get you a Library Card

You already have a library card with your local library, yes? If not, go do that. Then, navigate over to the Pierce County sign-up page and fill in your information. For “local branch” select any of them, you won’t be needing it for the e-learning resources. For “Reciprocal Borrowing Agreement” select “King County Library System” or whichever one applies. Submit the form and wait for a welcome email with card number.

(Edit: I didn’t receive a card number yet, but a reference librarian tells me: “Normally you’ll receive your temporary card number immediately and then receive a follow-up welcome email, but I’ve just verified with our IT folks that we’re experiencing some technical issues.” So, persevere!)

Step 2: Register on Treehouse

Once you have your Pierce County Library card number and PIN number (last 4 digits of your phone number), head over to the Treehouse Pierce County registration page and sign up for a new account. You’ll need to use an email address you haven’t already used with Treehouse, and you can sign up for a new one if needed with gmail or any free email service. I’m hoping that I’ll be able to transfer my existing Treehouse progress from my old account to the new one, and I’ll update when I find out if this is possible (but I’m expecting I’ll need to start from scratch).

Step 3: Be Classy

You’re now eligible to start taking classes or working on any of the Treehouse developer tracks that you choose! Here are some goodies:

  • Object-Oriented JavaScript with Andrew Chalkley
  • ActiveRecord Basics (for Rails) with Hampton Catlin
  • Harnessing the Power of VIM — I haven’t taken this one yet, but it’s on my list.
  • Learn Java Track — ditto to above (I did complete the Rails developer track)

With Treehouse, you get a public profile to show off what you’ve learned. Share yours in the comments when you successfully get registered!

Step 4: High-Five a Librarian

You probably want to hug them right now, but opt for an expression of gratitude that respects their personal space instead. Like maybe a nice note on Twitter about how awesome this partnership is that they can re-tweet, or go pay that long outstanding library fine you’ve been putting off.

——————————————————–

Happy studying, and spread the word! Got any favorite Treehouse courses? Link ’em in the comments!

*Title of this article from Tree House, by Shel Silverstein